Solomon Islands

Malaita (Auki)

Malaita Province is one of the most populous and developed of the Solomon Islands' Provinces. It consists of the main island of Malaita, home to many tribes of Melanesian peoples with many different language groups and customs, South Malaita island, and the two remote Polynesian atolls of Sikaiana and Ontong Java (or Lord Howe) to the east and far north, respectively. The Provincial capital is Auki, serviced by daily flights by Solomon Airlines and also a good shipping service.

A new port is to be built at Bina Harbour, and new industry is expected to spring up around this. Mineral resources including diamonds have been identified recently.

A new Solomon Airlines service has started from Honiara to the far northern atoll of Ontong Java. There are a few basic lodges and guesthouses in Auki such as the Auki Lodge. Visitors wishing to explore into the interior and stay in kastom villages can really experience the way of life. We can arrange day trips to Kastom villages with a feast, etc.

AUKI is the main town and administrative centre and can be reached by ferry as well as regular flights from Solomon Airlines and Western Pacific Air Services from Honiara.

LANGA LANGA LAGOON: The artificial islands are home to the famous shark callers, and Laulasi which has large spirit houses with high-pitched roofs.

On one fine example of a man-made island, Ferasubua Village is situated at the eastern tip of the great Lau Lagoon a few nautical miles from the Ataa Cove. It has a legend of being founded and built by an old warrior called Marukua from the Walo tribe of the Morodo Clan up the island of Malaita. Following the migration of this great warrior, many tribesmen followed suit and the island then grew to become a village for many years. The advent of Christianity in the 1900's saw the once hostile and pagan village turned into a peace-loving community.

LILISIANA: This village is home to a unique culture which originated on the artificial reef islands in Langa Langa lagoon. Observe shell money being manufactured and enjoy the golden beaches.

AOFIA, MAE'AENA, ANOANO AND ALITE: These cultural villages can be visited by arrangement.

MANA'AFE, AUMEA AND URU: These villages can also be visited by arrangement in a day trip from Auki.

BUSU CULTURAL VILLAGE: This is one of the unique areas where visitors can arrange to see cultural demonstrations.

Auki Lodge can arrange tours to Langa Langa and Lau Lagoons and other destinations:

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A one-hour motorised canoe ride from Auki will take you back in time to see and experience century old cultures of the seafaring people of the Langa Langa Lagoon. Here, on small man-made coral islands, little has changed over the centuries for these people who worship sharks as their deity. The skillful seafaring people of Langa Langa Lagoon have since been able to travel through to the 21st century, whilst embracing their rich and unique cultural heritage. Although Christianity has in many ways influenced their lives, it is generally practiced in tandem with their centuries old beliefs and traditions. The friendly and hospitable people are always proud to show visitors their traditional warriors' welcome dances, the ancient art of making shell-money and performances of witch doctor rituals, custom fortune telling and their ancestral skull shrines.

A three-hour motorised canoe ride from Auki will take you to Lau Lagoon. There, on the opposite side to the Langa Langa Lagoon people, north-east Malaita, live another tribe of seafaring people. Similar to the Langa Langa, the Lau also dwell on artificial islands built from coral blocks gathered from the reefs hundreds of years ago. About 30km long, the Lau Lagoon contains more than sixty artificial islands stretching from the shallowsbetween Uruuru and Maana'oba to Lolowai, the north southerly artificial land form. Like the Langa Langa people, some are still animist or pagan and have a strong history of shark worshipping especially on Funaafou Island.

Malaita Pan Pipers are world famous with their music and custom dancing. You can see regular performances in Honiara and at other times elsewhere.